"I climbed a mountain—another pleasant feat about as difficult as walking forward—and emerged above the clouds. After surveying the landscape, now a rolling sea of gray, I attempted to walk back down. But instead of walking, it felt like I was in a freefall, and I found myself in a dark and muted forest. Rain poured down. The change of scenery was invigorating; it invited new exploration. This is how Proteus pushes back: through its environment. Change doesn’t happen to you so much as they happen around you. In this respect, the “sit down” button makes sense. Often, you have to take a seat and listen to breathe it all in." (via Proteus | Review | The Gameological Society)

"I climbed a mountain—another pleasant feat about as difficult as walking forward—and emerged above the clouds. After surveying the landscape, now a rolling sea of gray, I attempted to walk back down. But instead of walking, it felt like I was in a freefall, and I found myself in a dark and muted forest. Rain poured down. The change of scenery was invigorating; it invited new exploration. This is how Proteus pushes back: through its environment. Change doesn’t happen to you so much as they happen around you. In this respect, the “sit down” button makes sense. Often, you have to take a seat and listen to breathe it all in." (via Proteus | Review | The Gameological Society)

With every action Link takes, or doesn’t take, a stone is cast and the ripple is felt universally in Majora’s Mask. That’s what the game is wholly about; being the stone in the pond, and creating various ripples, until the ripples eventually lead you to the right ending. And that’s why it’s revolutionary in its own right. It was playing with a depth most games, let alone console games, had yet to touch for the era. It was looking at a scope as big as Mass Effect’s and a level of depth belonging to Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind in terms of the size of the cast and missions.
It was the antithesis of linear. (via A Second Look: Majora’s Mask | Hellmode)

With every action Link takes, or doesn’t take, a stone is cast and the ripple is felt universally in Majora’s Mask. That’s what the game is wholly about; being the stone in the pond, and creating various ripples, until the ripples eventually lead you to the right ending. And that’s why it’s revolutionary in its own right. It was playing with a depth most games, let alone console games, had yet to touch for the era. It was looking at a scope as big as Mass Effect’s and a level of depth belonging to Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind in terms of the size of the cast and missions.

It was the antithesis of linear. (via A Second Look: Majora’s Mask | Hellmode)

“The most dangerous icon on your laptop screen is the little “Reply All” square. It looks innocent enough, a little envelope with an arrow. But when you click on it at the wrong time you know instantaneously that you could be in deep yogurt.
As the message heads into the ether, you wish there was a “Never Mind” icon. Hitting that innocuous looking icon with a gentle touch can induce nausea and fear, it can change the course of a career. The recipients or the “All” might respond or might not. Your friends might respond with an “Uh, oh” or WTF.” (via My Best Mistake: Reply All… | LinkedIn)

The most dangerous icon on your laptop screen is the little “Reply All” square. It looks innocent enough, a little envelope with an arrow. But when you click on it at the wrong time you know instantaneously that you could be in deep yogurt.

As the message heads into the ether, you wish there was a “Never Mind” icon. Hitting that innocuous looking icon with a gentle touch can induce nausea and fear, it can change the course of a career. The recipients or the “All” might respond or might not. Your friends might respond with an “Uh, oh” or WTF.” (via My Best Mistake: Reply All… | LinkedIn)

Whatever the doctrine, institutional knowledge of war at sea is a precious commodity, increasingly rare: the junior officers who fought at Leyte Gulf retired between the 1960s and the early 1980s. The average American World War II veteran was born in 1919, making the median age 90 at this writing while the teenaged Sailors of VJ-Day now are in their early 80s. Therefore, personal knowledge of such events is vanishing at an accelerated rate and will be gone in a decade.

Fear and Loathing in the Post-Naval Era | U.S. Naval Institute
"“You already see hints of the Star Trek computer in your phone,” Singhal said. “Now we’re trying to get it to a point where it passes the ‘toothbrush test’ of you using it twice a day.” Singhal predicted that will happen in three years’ time—by then, he says, Google’s Star Trek machine will be so good that you’ll ask it a question and expect a correct answer at least twice a day. “And in five years you won’t believe you ever lived without it. You’ll look back at today’s search engine and you’ll say, ‘Is that really how we searched?’”" (via Google has a single towering obsession: It wants to build the Star Trek computer. - Slate Magazine)

"“You already see hints of the Star Trek computer in your phone,” Singhal said. “Now we’re trying to get it to a point where it passes the ‘toothbrush test’ of you using it twice a day.” Singhal predicted that will happen in three years’ time—by then, he says, Google’s Star Trek machine will be so good that you’ll ask it a question and expect a correct answer at least twice a day. “And in five years you won’t believe you ever lived without it. You’ll look back at today’s search engine and you’ll say, ‘Is that really how we searched?’”" (via Google has a single towering obsession: It wants to build the Star Trek computer. - Slate Magazine)

“When making senior appointments, I look both for two things: readiness for the job and potential for further development. Readiness is about the fit between the requirements of the position and the candidate at that particular stage in his or her career. It rests on critical competencies and cultural fit. And, in my view, non-linear job changes can tell a lot about several powerful emotional intelligence-based competencies — flexibility, adaptability, empathy, organizational awareness and relationship management — that differentiate stars from average performers in new roles.” (via Why I Like People with Unconventional Resumés - Claudio Fernández-Aráoz - Harvard Business Review)

When making senior appointments, I look both for two things: readiness for the job and potential for further development. Readiness is about the fit between the requirements of the position and the candidate at that particular stage in his or her career. It rests on critical competencies and cultural fit. And, in my view, non-linear job changes can tell a lot about several powerful emotional intelligence-based competencies — flexibility, adaptability, empathy, organizational awareness and relationship management — that differentiate stars from average performers in new roles.” (via Why I Like People with Unconventional Resumés - Claudio Fernández-Aráoz - Harvard Business Review)